Broken Bones: A Note About Children


 

Welcome to our health education library. The information shared below is provided to you as an educational and informational source only and is not intended to replace a medical examination or consultation, or medical advice given to you by a physician or medical professional.

Broken Bones: A Note About Children

A child's bones heal the same way as an adult's. But since a child's bones are still growing, there are a few special concerns.

If a fracture goes through the growth plate, the bone may not grow correctly.

 

Growth Plates

Growth plates are fragile groups of cells at the ends of a child's long bones (such as the arms and legs). Growth plates ensure the bones keep growing until they reach full length. If a growth plate is damaged in a fracture, the bone may not grow as it should. Fractures involving growth plates may require more follow-up visits to make sure the bones are growing properly.

Remodeling

Remodeling happens more quickly in children than in adults. This means a child's broken bone may not need to be lined up perfectly. As it heals, the bone straightens through remodeling. The younger a child is, the better the bones will line up.

Location
Hannon Orthopedics
99 N La Cienega Blvd, Suite 304
Beverly Hills, CA 90211
Phone: 310-736-3971
Fax: 424-355-0555
Office Hours

Get in touch

310-736-3971