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Welcome to our health education library. The information shared below is provided to you as an educational and informational source only and is not intended to replace a medical examination or consultation, or medical advice given to you by a physician or medical professional.

Treating Flexor Tendon LacerationsTratamiento de laceraciones del tend³n flexor

Treating Flexor Tendon Lacerations

Your doctor can tell if your flexor tendon is cut by examining your finger. If the wound is very deep, the finger may be x-rayed to make sure the bone isn't damaged, too. If the flexor tendon is cut all the way through, your doctor will do surgery to rejoin the two ends of the tendon and repair any other damaged tissue. After surgery, you'll need to follow a specific exercise program to regain movement in the finger.

Image of flexor tendon
Zigzag-shaped incision

Image of fingers
To rejoin the cut tendon, your doctor stitches the two ends back together. Sometimes nearby tissue also needs to be repaired.

Your Surgery

  • Your surgeon first exposes the cut tendon with a zigzag-shaped incision.

  • Then he or she finds the two separated ends and stitches them back together. In some cases, your surgeon may need to graft a new tendon to replace the cut one.

  • Nerves and other soft tissue may also need to be repaired.

  • Surgery generally takes 2 to 3 hours. You may be given anesthesia to make you sleep, or only the hand and arm may be numbed. In either case, you feel no pain during surgery. Usually you can go home the same day.

Hand in cast
Your hand may be in a splint or cast for several weeks after surgery.

Starting Your Recovery

Your hand may be in a splint or cast for several weeks after surgery. This protects the tendon as it heals. You will probably start a gentle exercise program soon after surgery. Exercising your finger as directed by your doctor or therapist is very important. Surgery creates scar tissue inside the finger. Without regular exercise, this tissue will stick to the tendon and the bone. Then you won't be able to bend your finger easily. As the tendon heals, you'll slowly begin to strengthen the tendon and muscles, and move your finger more. Recovery usually takes 6 to 12 weeks.

Date Last Reviewed: 2007-01-15T00:00:00-07:00

Date Last Modified: 2002-07-09T00:00:00-06:00

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From the first interview/evaluation through the surgery and follow ups, I have felt taken care of and in excellent, professional and kind hands. Dr. Hannon is a remarkable man, a spectacular teacher as well as surgeon. He patiently answered every question and concern in the most understandable, apprehendable way. An excellent care giver and a gifted surgeon.
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Contact Us: 99 N La Cienega, Suite 304, Beverly Hills, CA 90211 •Phone: 310-362-3099 •Fax: 424-355-0555